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Cooked Sugar Stages (Fahrenheit/Celsius)

 

Depending on the source you use, there will be slightly different temperature ranges as well as descriptions for the various Cooked Sugar Stages. Therefore, it is best to use all of these tables as guides only to familiarize yourself with the various stages of cooked sugar, their corresponding temperatures, what the cooked sugar looks like at each stage, and their uses. One way to test for these stages, is to drop about a teaspoon of the cooked sugar into a glass of cold water. Then retrieve the sugar by pressing it gently between your thumb and forefinger and examine it to determine the stage. The higher the temperature of the cooked sugar, the less water there is in the sugar, so the firmer the sugar will be. Another way to determine the stage of the cooked sugar is with an accurate mercury or digital candy thermometer.

To Convert Fahrenheit to Celsius

Subtract 32, multiply by 5, then divide by 9

To Convert Celsius to Fahrenheit

Multiply by 9, divide by 5, then add 32.

 

Stage Fahrenheit (degrees F) Celsius (degrees C) Appearance and Uses
Thread 223-234 degrees F 106-112 degrees C Syrup will form a loose thin thread. Used for sugar syrups.

 

Soft Ball 234-240 degrees F 112-115 degrees C Syrup will form a soft, sticky ball that can be flattened when removed from the water. Used for caramels, fudge, pralines,  fondant, and butter creams.

 

Firm Ball 242-248 degrees F 116-120 degrees C Syrup will form a firm but pliable, sticky ball that holds it shape briefly. Used for caramels, butter creams, nougat, marshmallows, Italian meringues, gummies, and toffees.

 

Hard Ball 250-266 degrees F 122-130 degrees C Syrup will form a hard, sticky ball that holds its shape. Used for caramels, nougat, divinity and toffees.

 

Soft Crack 270-290 degrees F 132-143 degrees C Syrup will form strands that are firm yet pliable. Used for butterscotch, firm nougat, and taffy.

 

Hard Crack 295-310 degrees F 146-155 degrees C Syrup will form threads that are stiff (brittle) and break easily. Used for brittles, toffees, glazed fruit, hard candy, pulled poured and spun sugar.

 

Caramel 320-360 degrees F 160-182 degrees C Syrup will become transparent and will change color, ranging from light golden brown to dark amber. Used for pralines, brittles, caramel-coated molds, and nougatine.
 

   
 
 
     
 

 

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